Slimmer Leishman relishes Open return


Marc Leishman is a new man; not a svelte man by any stretch of the imagination, but a smaller imitation of himself.

It’s not something that merely happened. The Australian star has lost eight kilograms on his new diet by cutting out bread and sugar and reducing beer intake over the past few months.

His methodology is that it will help prevent the injuries and illnesses that dogged him in the middle stretch of 2019. He had back issues and pneumonia during the US PGA Tour playoffs, and it was after the Open Championship at Royal Portrush in July that he made a decision to act.

“I don’t think it ever just happens, not to me anyway, “ Leishman said.

“I just wanted to change my eating habits. I’ve had a few back issues popping up. I mean I’ve lost eight kilos, not a whole lot of weight, but you put eight kilos in a suitcase and carry that around all the time it makes a difference. I feel better for it now.”

Leishman will be one of the top Australian hopes at The Australian this week in his first appearance in a national Open since 2015. It’s a huge fortnight for him as an International team member at the Presidents Cup in Melbourne next week, particular as he has never won a top level event in his home country despite a great record overseas.

The Victorian said time management would be a key for him.  “Switching on and off between shots, not stressing about what might happen or what might not happen,” he said. “That’s a bad habit for me, or it has been in the past. Doing that will help just conserve energy and I think that’s a big thing.”

While he tries to treat all tournaments with the same gravity, he admits that the Open and the Presidents Cup are key for him.  “Every Australian golfer wants to win the national Open, and then I’ve been on three losing Presidents Cup teams, and I don’t really want it to be four!’’ he said.

As for his body shape, he knows that being at home is not exactly going to help. He’s launching a new range of his ‘Leishman Lager’ soon in Melbourne, and the pies taste good.  “It’s going to be easier said than done now that I’m home in Australia. But it was a conscious thing I did and I’m glad I did it,” he said.


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