The PGA Golf Club: Nick O’Hern on his career highlights and a change of direction


Since retiring from full-time golf Nick O’Hern is relishing the opportunity to provide up and coming golfers with the tools they need to succeed. Known as Mr Consistency throughout his 20-year career, O’Hern’s approach to course strategy and the mental side of the game, as well as his renowned short-game, have him in high demand […]

Since retiring from full-time golf Nick O’Hern is relishing the opportunity to provide up and coming golfers with the tools they need to succeed.

Known as Mr Consistency throughout his 20-year career, O’Hern’s approach to course strategy and the mental side of the game, as well as his renowned short-game, have him in high demand in his new home in Melbourne.

Appearing as a co-host on the latest episode of The PGA Golf Club, O’Hern spoke about the new direction his career has taken since moving from the US in January.

“I’ve been trying to help some elite players and some young pros and as it turns out, in the last few months, more just the everyday golfer,” O’Hern said.

“It’s more a mentoring role that I take on than a coaching or a technique type thing. I find my strengths lie more in course strategy and the mental side.

“Funnily enough I started out as a teaching pro when I was in my early 20s and I wasn’t good enough to play the game at that point. I then figured out how to play for about 20 years or so and now I’ve come full circle. It’s great to get back into that element and I’m thoroughly enjoying it.”

Throughout his career on the PGA TOUR, O’Hern believed one of the most important things he could do for his own game was to learn from those around him, particularly when he went up against the best in the world.

“I’m probably most well-known in the States for beating Tiger a couple of times,” he said.

“I think it’s good to watch other people and learn from other people. One of my biggest strengths was that I never got consumed by what other guys were doing, especially in matchplay funnily enough.

“To be out-driven by 40 or 50 meters on most holes and not get put off by that is an interesting challenge. But that was my whole career, I was always 30 or 40 meters behind guys but I just thought, well, I know I can’t hit it that far, how can I be better than others?”

“I think for the average golfer out there the best thing is to realise what your strengths are and what your weaknesses are. I knew what I could or couldn’t do so I didn’t try and do things that I shouldn’t and play to them. And play more to your personality.”

To hear Nick O’Hern’s full chat on The PGA Golf Club podcast including details on his Presidents Cup efforts in 2005 and 2007 as well as his tips for up and coming golfers click here.


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